Health & WASH

Health & WASH

The health and well-being of women and children has been a main priority for SOUL since inception. All development interventions SOUL has implemented have had both an indirect and direct positive impact on the well-being of millions of women and children nationally.

The health and well-being of women and children has been a main priority for SOUL since inception. All development interventions SOUL has implemented have had both an indirect and direct positive impact on the well-being of millions of women and children nationally.
Recognizing the important role safe water and sanitation play in regard to peoples’ overall health and well-being, SOUL has also been supporting WASH humanitarian relief efforts. Not just in terms of the physical infrastructure needed, but equally as important is educating communities, on individual and professional levels, about proper WASH knowledge, attitudes and practices. SOUL has increasingly integrated healthy practices into its interventions, and more recently has specifically integrated WASH related interventions into all health-related projects, to amplify the impact on health and combating disease.

The history of Yemen’s health care has suffered from continued stressors, challenges and obstacles; affecting health care coverage and services on all levels. Although for decades the health care system was making slow development progress, it continued to suffer from a weak infrastructure; a lack of easy accessibility and resources; insufficient numbers of qualified medical professionals; and a general lack of adequate public health education. Public social norms and lack of understanding and trust in the health system have also led to lower levels of public usage of facilities. With increasing professionalism, resources and better transportation, public accessibility usage and trust began to increase. Quality and scope of health care was expanding in both the private and public sector, bringing health care services to remote areas of Yemen. This led to an overall slight improvement of health indicators; especially those
related to women and children.
Historically, Yemen has suffered continuous challenges, in regard to providing the public with an adequate clean water supply and proper sanitation system. According to the 2019 HNO by OCHA, WASH (water, sanitation, hygiene) needs remain consistently grim and overwhelmingly under met; with a severe lack of adequate national infrastructure leading to an escalation in all WASH related diseases, including cholera and malnutrition. Due to this, a national WASH response was started in 2010.
Although these moderate attempts provided more expansive WASH services; the crisis in 2015 brought with it dire consequences for the population and had negative repercussions on every aspect of life.

Since the national crises began in 2015, the entire health care system has been dramatically negatively impacted and has deteriorated to less than half of its pre-crises capacity. This present state has had profound negative repercussions on the health and wellbeing of Yemenis; but especially among the most vulnerable groups, in particular, women and children. According to the ‘Humanitarian Needs Overview-
Yemen’ (HNO, 2019); two-thirds of the population, approximately 19.7 million, are in need of health care assistance; while the health care system has decreased by almost 50 % of its previous capability in both the physical infrastructure and professional capacity. Additionally, there remains a critical shortage of medicines, medical supplies and equipment. Presently only 20% of facilities still provide comprehensive
maternal and child health care and moreover immunization coverage has dropped dramatically. This current state is further compounded by the rising level of poverty and unemployment leading to peoples’ inability to even afford care when accessible. Furthermore, the health care crises has been further impacted by the lack of adequate water and sanitation availability and services.
By 2019, over 17 million were facing a need for basic services, with only 46% urban and 22% rural populations connected to any form of public water works and sanitation. The remaining people were exposed to excessive and dangerous means of water collection and sewage disposal, especially among the vulnerable groups (the poor and IDPs) with little to no resources.
SOUL plans to continue to work to help improve maternal and children health, by providing quality interventions and services that support the primary health care system. This will be achieved by providing essential maternal and newborn health educational and vital services. Also, professional capacity building will be provided for community health workers to improve the quality of work and services they provide.
Additionally, SOUL will focus on WASH needs by providing safe water and sanitation, while also encouraging proper hygienic practices. This multi-fold approach in supporting and promoting better health care will have an immediate effect and foster a sustainable long-term impact within the communities served.


Ongoing Projects

2020 Wash intervention targeting the at Famine Risk Community Mawiyah , Dimnat Khadir, and At Ta’iziyah (WASH Taiz)
By OCHA- YHF
2020
2019 - 2020 Wash intervention targeting the at Famine Risk Community in Maqbanah - Taizz Gov - (Parameter-1). (WASH Maqbanah)
By OCHA-YHF
2019 - 2020

Previous Projects

2018 - 2020 Sexual & Reproductive health and Rights in Emergencies(SRHR)
By CARE
2018 - 2020
2018 - 2019 Emergency WASH Project in 3 Taizz districts; Mawiyah , Dimnat Khadir, and At Ta’iziyah (WASH Taiz)
By OCHA- YHF
2018 - 2019
2018 WASH Cholera response at Households Level in the 10 districts in Amanat Al Asimah Governorates
By UNICEF
2018
2017 - 2018 Comprehensive WASH Cholera response at households Level in the three hotspot districts of Sana'a city
By UNICEF
2017 - 2018
2017 Cholera Response
By UNICEF
2017
2015 - 2016 Providing Lifesaving Health & WASH Interventions for IDPs & Hosting Communities - AlDhale’e
By OCHA- YHF
2015 - 2016
2013 - 2016 Promoting Small Family Norms in Yemen
By The Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands
2013 - 2016
2009 - 2014 Safe Motherhood Program (SMP)
By World Bank
2009 - 2014
2009 - 2010 Breast Cancer Awareness Campaign Project
By MEPI
2009 - 2010
2007 - 2008 Breast Feeding Promotion Program
By Al Aa’oun Foundation for Development
2007 - 2008
2007 Anti-Qat Campaign
By Qatar Charitable Association
2007
2003 Breast Feeding Promotion Program
By Islamic Bank For Development
2003
2002 - 2003 Environmental Health In Schools Training Program
By SFD
2002 - 2003
2002 Breast Feeding Promotion Program
By SFD
2002
1998 Breast Feeding Promotion Program
By British Embassy
1998
1997 The Development of Educational Material for Children About Rational Drug Use
By Yemen Drug Action Program (YemDAP)
1997